DeCode Congestion

We are inviting Strategists, technologists and engaged residents to take part in the City of Vancouver's DeCode Congestion Hackathon.  

We believe that the combination of data, technology, and talented Vancouver residents can create solutions that optimize street use for an efficient, safe, and reliable transportation network.

 

Friday

November 8

Saturday

November 9

Sunday

November 10

6:00 p.m. Registration Opens & Dinner 8:00 a.m. Breakfast/ Venue Opens 8:00 a.m.

Breakfast

SUBMISSION DEADLINE 8:30AM

6:30 p.m. Hackathon Kick-off & Opening Remarks 12:00 p.m. Lunch 9:00 a.m. Expo Kick-off
7:30 p.m. Team Formation & Hacking Begins 6:00 p.m. Dinner & Information about Submission and Expo 9:10 a.m. Expo Block 1
12:00 a.m. Venue Closes 11:00 p.m. Late-night Snack 10:50 a.m. Break
















The venue will be open overnight on Saturday for any participants who wish to work through the night. 













11:05 a.m. Expo Block 2
12:45 p.m. Lunch
1:35 p.m. Expo Block 3
3:15 p.m. Break
3:30 p.m. Top 5 Pitches
4:20 p.m. Judges Deliberations
4:35 p.m. Awards & Celebrations
5:00 p.m. Event Ends

 

THE CHALLENGE

“Use data and new technologies to create solutions that optimize street use for an efficient, safe, and reliable transportation network.”

 

BACKGROUND

The City of Vancouver is one of a few major cities in North America without a freeway system. The decision to not put a freeway through downtown set the stage for the green and livable lifestyle that Vancouver is known for today. Over the next 30 years, we’re expecting about 130,000 new residents and close to 90,000 new jobs, bringing more trips and more activity to Vancouver. The street network is largely built out, leaving few opportunities for building new roads. We need to make the most out of our existing network.

Vancouver has a history of prioritizing sustainable modes of transportation including walking, cycling, and transit. Since the 1997 Transportation Plan, policy prioritizing walking, cycling, and public transit has guided the direction of transportation and planning projects across the city. In 2012, Vancouver City Council approved Transportation 2040, a plan that sets specific targets to increase the sustainable transportation mode share to 50% of all trips by 2020, and two-thirds of all trips by 2040. In 2016, the City achieved the 2020 target, four years ahead of schedule. In 2017, the Congestion Management Strategy was adopted by the council. The strategy provides direction on identifying and monitoring congestion, developing strategies to address impacted areas, and tracking progress and results. In 2019, Vancouver City Council approved a Climate Emergency Motion to scale-up our climate action and limit warming to 1.5°C to avoid devastating climate breakdown, in line with recommendations made in the International Panel of Climate Change report and Paris agreement. This motion accelerates the Transportation 2040 goals to 2030.

 

Vancouver’s Congestion Management Strategy has five priority goal areas with dedicated targets:

1. IMPROVE MONITORING OF TRAFFIC CONDITIONS AND TRENDS

There is a need to measure baseline conditions of traffic volumes and trends to measure congestion and track progress on arterial streets. Once these baseline conditions are established, we can better understand where congestion is most problematic.

How can the City explore and implement new technologies to capture trends in travel time and reliability to help make informed decisions to address congestion?

 

2. IMPROVE ROAD SAFETY

The City set a goal of zero transportation-related fatalities in its Transportation 2040 Plan. In 2016, it released the Moving Towards Zero Strategy, which outlines strategies to achieve zero traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries on the road network by focusing on improvements to safety hotspots.

How can the City reduce the frequency and severity of collisions so that the street network can operate more safely and efficiently?

 

3. ENSURE A SMART AND EFFICIENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

The application of technology will play a vital role optimizing the City’s transportation system. Technology is particularly important for achieving efficiencies in Vancouver, as the City has little space left to add in new roadways.

How can the City take advantage of emerging technologies in data collection, such as smart street lighting and infrastructure to support connected and automated vehicles? 

 

4. COORDINATE STREET USE

Streets are used for many activities other than driving, including large and small scale events, staging for development and construction, and other activities such as filming. The diverse use of streets is a sign of a healthy, vibrant city with a strong economy.

Street use coordination is a key component of supporting the reliable operation of the City’s street network for the purposes of traveling. How can the City manage and coordinate impacts related to construction, development, and events?

 

5. PRIORITIZE PEOPLE AND GOODS MOVEMENT

The City has a hierarchy of transportation modes, with walking as the top priority, followed by cycling, transit, shared vehicles, and finally the private car. By shifting the preferred modes, there is more space on the road for goods movement to support our local, provincial, and national economies, as well as providing road space for emergency services.

 



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